So Fresh + So Clean 2018

Ethicalmetalsmiths-Students-logo.png

Ethical Metalsmith Students proudly present:

So Fresh + So Clean 2018
Student Exhibition and Emerging Artist Award

2018 Jury:
EM Students, VCU Chapter: Taylor Zarkades King, Anne Bujold, Everett Hoffman, Megan Wachs, Haiyin Liang
Guest Juror: Curtis Arima

above Poster is printed and mailed to student members and schools


So Fresh + So Clean 2018 Award Winners

Michael Hull
2018 EMERGING ARTIST
Prize $1000, Sponsor: Richline Group

Bachelor of Fine Arts 2018, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA

“My work is a response to the state of the world around me, specifically late-capitalism and the materials of the Anthropocene. Wastefulness abounds in this society built on convenience and commerce, and as a result there are excessive amounts of resources being discarded into landfills, oceans, and the spaces in which we live. In the streets, I find metal tobacco lids, bottle caps, and other rubbish, which I manipulate into forms representing the trash that is ever-present in the landscape. These “icons” of trash function as wearable jewelry objects, meant to be worn as badges of identity.”

 

Erica Hoosic
2018 GUEST JUROR'S CHOICE (Curtis Arima)
Prize $500, Sponsor: Rio Grande

Master of Fine Arts 2018, Kent State University, USA

“The wearable art-forms I create are scaled-down ecosystems made-up of collected discarded items that I have molded into natural looking forms. The discarded bits of ephemeral debris are used as my material to make synthetic nature pieces to set into my work. The vegetation species that I make are inspired by thinking about the human form as a celestial body. I form the discarded material to mimic nature. I do this to relate the unwanted material to the nature of humankind. Nothing else in nature creates product waste this issue is unique to that of humankind. I observe what discarded products of industry look like against flora. I imagine what foliage would look like if it had to be rebuilt after extinction. I imagine what materials will be left on Earth at the end of time.”

 

Nina Van Duijnhoven
2018 EM STUDENT'S CHOICE
Prize $250, Sponsor: No Dirty Gold

Bachelor of Applied Arts 2017, Whitireia, New Zealand

“A burning question.”

“This work examines our attitudes towards the use of energy and climate change. Even though there is an increasing awareness about global warming, carbon emissions are still on the rise.
Is global warming real and should we urgently change our use our energies such as coal and oil or else face world-wide disaster?

While we may feel powerless in the face of many world-wide problems, do we all have a role to play at individual and government level when it comes to climate change?

Many people think that our social and political efforts are too insignificant to make a difference. But, if we all influence each other, could the ripple effect be more powerful than we can imagine?”

 

So Fresh + So Clean Showcase

So Fresh:
Work that’s happening now, challenging how we define the field of metalsmithing and jewelry.

So Clean:
Looking at how our studio practices impact the environment and human health.

 

To view all image and artist details, use a computer rather then phone. Click on image and hover to see details. 


Thank you to our So Fresh + So Clean sponsors!

 
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Copy of Rio Grande Logo.jpg
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So Fresh + So Clean 2017

Ethicalmetalsmiths-Students-logo.png

Ethical Metalsmith Students proudly present:

So Fresh + So Clean 2017
Student Exhibition and Emerging Artist Award

2017 Jury:
EM Students, VCU Chapter: Anne Bujold, Everett Hoffman, Haiyin Liang, and Meg Wachs
Guest Juror: Christine Clark

above Poster is printed and mailed to student members and schools


So Fresh + So Clean 2017 Award Winners

Katie Kameen
2017 EMERGING ARTIST
Prize $1000, Sponsor: Richline Group

Masters of Fine Arts 2016, Indiana University, USA

“One of the primary goals in my studio is to use as much recycled material as possible. My work is mostly constructed from found materials which have been discarded because they were broken, old, or outdated. I have also begun to source material from discarded packaging; as my city only recycles #1 and #2 plastics, and #3-7 plastics are all sent to a landfill. In keeping with this mindset, I also strive to create pieces that are durable, yet impermanent. By using cold connections, pieces can be taken apart again and remixed into new works. It is important to decrease our plastic consumption, and by juxtaposing contemporary plastics with thrifted or salvaged items from the 50’s and 60’s, my work highlights how non-biodegradable these materials are. Many of the pieces I use still look brand new and by transforming them into wearable jewelry I hope to not only show the dangers of excessive plastic waste, but also to inspire viewers to find new uses for their old plastics. I aim to make art that is not purely decorative, but that will help to change habits, and decrease consumption.”

 

RACHEL ANDREA DAVIS
2018 GUEST JUROR'S CHOICE (Christine Clark)
Prize $500, Sponsor: Rio Grande

Master of Arts 2017, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA

“I am an avid recycler and reuser. Within my studio practice, I reuse items from my home life, integrating them into my studio practice. Empty yogurt containers hold components, my silver scraps go into a gelato container, and my flux container is an old spice jar. As the storeroom manager at Kent State, I have also taken to saving every shipping box and all of the packing materials and plastic bags that come in. This stash makes it easy to package and ship work to different venues while also keeping plastic out of the landfills.

Recycling and reusing also comes into my work through material usage. Eggshells, often thrown away despite being able to be composted, have become an integral part to my work. Not only do they serve for a delicate surface embellishment, but they also allow me to achieve a unique texture with the rolling mill, avoiding harsh etching chemicals. The wood used in my pieces has either been found on walks or come from scraps given to me by my woodworking colleagues. I strive for every bit of my materials to be used or recycled, oftentimes storing leftovers until I stumble upon a suitable use.”

 

KYRI HINKLEMAN
2017 EM STUDENT'S CHOICE
Prize $250, Sponsor: No Dirty Gold

Graduate Student, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA

“By working with found objects, my metalsmithing practice results in not only unique and one of a kind pieces, but also remains ethical and responsible. When walking and exploring outdoors, I often have my eyes towards the ground, subconsciously looking for interesting bits and pieces that differ from their surroundings. By picking up discarded objects, I am not only collecting fragments for future creations, but I am also removing things that are often classified as litter. To me, these materials have much more personality and tell a truer story than mass-produced, sourced components. My desire to give the found objects a second life is how I keep my materials and practice sustainable.”

 

Greetings from Ethical Metalsmith Students,

It is a great honor to be a part of this process, and we would like to extend our gratitude to Guest Juror Christine Clark for her contribution to the success of this year’s exhibition.

Finding a way to make a completely green practice is a lofty goal, and continually expanding the knowledge base of ethical studio practices remains the heart of our mission. This effort will always be a product of the contributions of our community members, without whom this would be a hollow effort. We are incredibly thankful to the Ethical Metalsmiths, our award sponsors, and everyone else who volunteers their energy and efforts to move this project forward.

Ethical Metalsmiths Students, VCU Chapter

Anne Bujold, Everett Hoffman, Haiyin Liang, and Meg Wachs

We are thrilled to present the 2017 So Fresh + So Clean Online Juried Exhibition and Emerging Artist Award. The array of work and number of submissions left us truly humbled. To see students engage in environmental, social, and human health concerns in growing numbers speaks well for the future of our field.

Each year, we ask the student community to submit their best work, highlighting their connection to craft tradition as well as the ways in which they view contemporary concerns. By bridging the connection between material sourcing and crafted outcomes, these students show us many approaches to altering our impact on the planet. Through considerate recycling and reuse practices, we find opportunities to keep materials out of the landfill and in useful circulation. In approaching their making from many different perspectives –  from the aesthetic to conceptual to environmental – these artists represent a community of makers who will change the landscape of the metalsmithing field for years to come.


So Fresh + So Clean 2017 Showcase

So Fresh:
Work that’s happening now, challenging how we define the field of metalsmithing and jewelry.

So Clean:
Looking at how our studio practices impact the environment and human health.

 

To view all image and artist details, use a computer rather then phone. Click on image and hover to see details. 


Thank you to our So Fresh + So Clean sponsors!

Copy of RichlineGroup-logo.jpg
Copy of Rio Grande Logo.jpg
Copy of nodirtygoldlogo_USE THIS.jpg

So Fresh + So Clean 2016

Ethicalmetalsmiths-Students-logo.png

Ethical Metalsmith Students proudly present:

So Fresh + So Clean 2016
Student Exhibition and Emerging Artist Award

2016 Jury:
EM Students, VCU Chapter: Kelley Morrison and Lucy Louise Derickson
Guest Juror: Stephanie Voegele

above Poster is printed and mailed to student members and schools


So Fresh + So Clean 2016 Award Winners

Rebecca Lynn Hewitt
2016 EMERGING ARTIST
Prize $1000, Sponsor: Richline Group

Bachelor of Fine Arts 2016, The University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, USA

“My biggest concern in the jewelry and metals field right now is the lack of conversation surrounding obtaining a more ethical practice. In my studies, there was little conversation surrounding responsible Metalsmithing. The lack of conversation about how to have an ethical practice is alarming because it doesn’t need to be difficult. I’ve found that the more I actively seek to talk with others about the way that they achieve a more ethical practice, the more I’m able to research and change my own practice to be more ethical.”


Clair Poppi
2016 GUEST JUROR'S CHOICE (Stephanie Voegele)
Prize $500, Sponsor: Rio Grande

Graduate Student, Queensland College of Art (Griffith University), AUS

“My work is primarily concerned with the modes of mass production in commercial jewellery manufacture which have led to a throw away, fast fashion aesthetic where consumers are removed from the processes behind the construction of what they consume and the environmental impacts of their habits. Through social engagement ‘147 grams, 3 carats’ seeks to connect with participants in an intimate way, delving into their personal lives to create highly sentimental jewellery which is experienced, worn and documented, to then be destroyed, re-designed and re-made for the next participant. Starting with 147grams of recycled silver 1 and approximately 3 carats of ethically sourced 2 QLD topaz, zircon and sapphires, these same materials are recycled and re-used throughout the project, playing with the idea of fast fashion while demonstrating for participants an ethical production model to inform their future jewellery consumption choices.”


Emily Culver
2016 EM STUDENT'S CHOICE
Prize $250, Sponsor: No Dirty Gold

Graduate Student, Cranbrook Academy of Art, USA

“As an artist, I try to use recycled or scrap materials (mainly wood and metal) as well as repurposed objects in my work whenever possible. I feel that a responsible practice entails not only being resourceful, but also having a sufficient understanding of how raw materials are processed. Only through gaining this understanding can one fully appreciate the materials that one works with.”


A message from Ethical Metalsmiths Students,

Thank you, once again, to all that submitted work to this year’s So Fresh + So Clean Ethical Metalsmiths International Student Exhibition and Emerging Artist Award! We are grateful to those who see their work through the lens of environmental and human health, and for showing us a glimpse of your studio practice. We are excited to share with you a collection of student work from around the world that strengthens and exemplifies the mission of Ethical Metalsmiths.

What does it mean to be an Ethical Metalsmith? We have found that students have defined this through material sourcing, healthy studio practices, and engaging their viewers through conceptual investigation.

The Ethical Metalsmiths Students strives to be a platform through which students can showcase what being ethical means to them. Students are looking outside of themselves and their work to see and embrace a bigger picture in which the objects we make and the materials we use matter. A fully sustainable practice may not be an attainable goal, but we are encouraged by how many students are constantly striving to make informed and thoughtful decisions about their practice.

As So Fresh + So Clean continue to grow we hope that these values find their way into studios and classrooms around the world. The only way to get there is to keep encouraging work that considers ethical making and to keep talking about ways that we can all do better!

Ethical Metalsmiths Students, VCU Chapter

Lucy Derickson and Kelley Morrison

 

So Fresh + So Clean 2016 Showcase

So Fresh:
Work that’s happening now, challenging how we define the field of metalsmithing and jewelry.

So Clean:
Looking at how our studio practices impact the environment and human health.

 

To view all image and artist details, use a computer rather then phone. Click on image and hover to see details. 


Thank you to our So Fresh + So Clean sponsors!

Copy of RichlineGroup-logo.jpg
Copy of Rio Grande Logo.jpg
Copy of nodirtygoldlogo_USE THIS.jpg

So Fresh + So Clean 2015

Ethicalmetalsmiths-Students-logo.png

Ethical Metalsmith Students proudly present:

So Fresh + So Clean 2015
Student Exhibition and Emerging Artist Award

2015 Jury:
EM Students, VCU Chapter: Lucy Louise Derickson, Kelley Morrison, Jane Barton, Carli Holcomb, and Morgan Babic
Guest Juror: Renee Zettle-Sterling

above Poster is printed and mailed to student members and schools


So Fresh + So Clean 2015 Award Winners

Soohye Park
2015 EMERGING ARTIST
Prize $1000, Sponsor: Richline Group

Master of Fine Arts 2015, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

“One thing that most concerns me in the process of making jewelry and metal work, is the very simple and fundamental practice of being aware of my waste and consumption. I hope people become more aware of how much water we waste, for example, or how much toxic materials we use and pour down the drain each day. If we practice little green habits like collecting silver dust, and using towels instead of paper towels every time to dry out a piece, we will not only be helping ourselves financially, but also doing our part to help the environment.”


Joshua Kosker
2015 GUEST JUROR'S CHOICE (Renee Zettle-Sterling)
Prize $500, Sponsor: Rio Grande

Master of Fine Arts 2015, Bowling Green State University, USA

“Opportunities to sustain our material culture while making a meaningful impact in the field are commonplace, existing between the routines and realities of production and consumption. While it is virtually inconceivable to maintain a completely ethical practice, it is possible to reconsider working with what is already at hand, or just within reach. As a result of this shift and the potential for alternative material sources in jewelry and metalsmithing, we may become more aware of our intentions for creating in the first place.”


Fiona Christeller
2015 EM STUDENT'S CHOICE
Prize $250, Sponsor: No Dirty Gold

Bachelor of Visual Arts, Whitireia New Zealand, New Zealand

“Working with left over scrap and sample building materials is a natural extension of having been an architect; construction waste being a sustainablility issue for all contracts.

These works all use zinc and perforated steel as their primary material, mixed with recycled and/or found materials (silver, ceramic beads, copper electrical wire, thread, and bamboo). Using an understanding of materials, form and proportion the jewellery is reminiscent of architectural structures but is created at a new and wearable scale.”


A message from Ethical Metalsmiths Students,

The members of the Ethical Metalsmiths Students would like to thank those who submitted work, and supported the So Fresh + So Clean student exhibition.  An incredible number of submissions were received, and with the help of our generous sponsors we were able to put together a carefully curated show, and create awards for three artists.

One significant goal for So Fresh + So Clean was to begin a dialog about the variety of ways artists can define what it means to be an ethical metalsmith. We understand a completely sustainable practice to be a farfetched notion. Being conscientious of this fact, becoming aware of the ways our practice impacts environmental and human health, is therefore the first step and adds an important layer to the creative decision making of artists.

We are excited to present to you student and recently graduated artists who are helping us start this global movement. So Fresh + So clean represents artists from ten countries on four different continents.

These artists are buying materials locally, finding ethically sourced materials, reconsidering their chemical consumption and disposal, exploring fabrication methods, giving life to used or discarded materials, using green packaging materials, and joining like minded community groups all while creating work rich in content and that advances contemporary metalsmithing.

As So Fresh + So Clean spreads to communities across the world remember it is a catalyst to a longer even richer dialogue. We hope that as So Fresh + So Clean and Emerging Artist awards gain momentum we will continue to explore and redefine ethical practice. Join the conversation that will promote awareness and changes that will have lasting effects in shared and personal studio spaces around the world.

Ethical Metalsmiths Students, VCU Chapter

Lucy Louise Derickson, Kelley Morrison, Jane Barton, Carli Holcomb, and Morgan Babic

 

So Fresh + So Clean 2015 Showcase

So Fresh:
Work that’s happening now, challenging how we define the field of metalsmithing and jewelry.

So Clean:
Looking at how our studio practices impact the environment and human health.

 

To view all image and artist details, use a computer rather then phone. Click on image and hover to see details. 


Thank you to our So Fresh + So Clean sponsors!

Copy of RichlineGroup-logo.jpg
Copy of Rio Grande Logo.jpg
Copy of nodirtygoldlogo_USE THIS.jpg

So Fresh + So Clean 2014

Ethicalmetalsmiths-Students-logo.png

Ethical Metalsmith Students proudly present:

So Fresh + So Clean 2014
Student Exhibition and Emerging Artist Award

2014 Jury:
EM Students, VCU Chapter: Lucy Louise Derickson, Kelley Morrison, Jane Barton, Brian Fleetwood

above Poster is printed and mailed to student members and schools


So Fresh + So Clean 2014 Award Winners

Joshua Kosker
2014 EMERGING ARTIST
Prize $1000, Sponsor: Richline Group

Master of Fine Arts 2015, Bowling Green State University, USA

“In my most recent series of brooches, I combine memory foam with repurposed silver-plated brass holloware. I am interested in the symbolic (associative and suggestive) nature of hollowware and its ability to both reveal and conceal, while giving structure to the shapeless. The salver, historically a symbol of dignity and high society, is dismantled and then reconstructed with familiar elements and forms to create new narratives of personal value and self-worth through body adornment. By salvaging and encasing the memories of the past between layers of metaphorical cultural consumption, I am laying those former abusive practices to rest while simultaneously breathing new life into wearable objects.”


Hayley Beckley
2014, 2nd place winner
Prize $500, Sponsor: Rio Grande

Bachelor of Fine Arts 2015, Birmingham City University, UK

“I try to work in the most ethical way as possible and think that a sustainable approach underpins most aspects of my practice. Specifically, I source materials as locally as I can and make considered material choices. The sterling silver I use is all recycled and I use a salt and vinegar mix to clean the silver after soldering. The bamboo silk is a far more sustainable choice because of its reduced environmental impact and also the strength and durability of the material itself. I hope that in using high quality materials and striving for a high standard of finish, I have created pieces that will last a lifetime, fighting against the prevalent trend for resource-draining, throwaway fashion. My printing is done locally, using water-based inks and by a company with a strong environmental responsibility policy. I use all recycled packaging from another sustainably focused printer.”


Jessica Andersen
2014, 3rd place winner
Prize $250, Sponsor: No Dirty Gold

Master of Visual Arts, San Diego State University, USA

“Waste lies in the streets; evidence of their former use found in their stains and wear. A thing that seems to be devoid of value and meaning waits to be noticed.
It is my hope that the audience will become more aware of waste, and may begin to question their intimate relationships to objects in an attempt to develop new consciousness in daily life. I believe that by making the invisible, visible; we can begin to acknowledge our role and responsibility in our environment. In my studio practice, I am always striving to be as green as I can. By finding alternatives for chemicals or trying to recycle as much as possible. I think by doing the little things we can begin to create good habits, and through those habits we can effect change in our practice and our environment.”


A message from the Executive Director, Christina Miller

So Fresh + So Clean, Ethical Metalsmiths’ first annual student exhibition, and Emerging Artist Award mark a new era for our community. EM is grateful for the tireless work of the volunteer student committee and thankful for all the students that became members and submitted work for the exhibition this year. Thank you also to our sponsors of So Fresh + So Clean.

Students are innovators, always trying new things, managing fears and failure – prerequisites for learning – and exposing their ideas to critique. It is their duty to be “So Fresh”. Ethical Metalsmiths is inspired by the students and recent graduates located around the world that took the risk and shared their work and ideas for public exhibition. The statements, a mandatory aspect of the application process, include a range of “So Clean” approaches that reveal the personal values informing best practices.

Ethical Metalsmiths believe that independent jewelers and artists are the pioneers of the ethical jewelry movement. If made from a point of awareness of mining issues and respect for people and the planet jewelry and metalsmithed objects can generate good and decrease harm in the world. By working together and sharing ideas about responsibility, environmental protections and human rights, we will continue to develop innovative solutions for the future.

Both the So Fresh + So Clean exhibition and the Emerging Artist Award act as transparent benchmarks for the ethical jewelry and metalsmithing movement. The pieces and statements inspire an optimism for the future as well as challenge what has already been accomplished. Benchmark measurements necessitate re-evaluation and inquiry. Some questions Ethical Metalsmiths is asking include whether or not students have enough opportunities to contribute their ideas to the movement and whether or not the purveyors of the movement are doing enough to educate students. The goal: responsibility is the norm.

Ethical Metalsmiths is committed to student makers – their ideas and their futures (our future). The works and statements of So Fresh + So Clean engage, inspire curiosity and stimulate a constant re-evaluation of our habits and beliefs.

Christina Miller, Executive Director
Ethical Metalsmiths 

 

So Fresh + So Clean 2014 Showcase

So Fresh:
Work that’s happening now, challenging how we define the field of metalsmithing and jewelry.

So Clean:
Looking at how our studio practices impact the environment and human health.

 

To view all image and artist details, use a computer rather then phone. Click on image and hover to see details. 


Thank you to our So Fresh + So Clean sponsors!

Copy of RichlineGroup-logo.jpg
Copy of Rio Grande Logo.jpg
Copy of nodirtygoldlogo_USE THIS.jpg